Stubborn Fat : The Facts

EVERYONE walking the face of this earth has an abundance of
fat cells throughout their bodies. In fact, if you’re a healthy
adult with normal body composition, you have approximately
30 billion fat cells. This is an astronomical number when you
think about it. Did you ever wonder why you have so many?
Have you ever wondered what those fat cells are for?

Fat Cells Are Genetically Programmed

The answer is, fat cells are part of our genetic code and they
enable us to use stored energy when food is scarce. This survival
mechanism works very much the same today as it did 10,000
years ago. However, there is an abundance of food in modern
society today, and we no longer need to store so much fat to
survive.

When you consume too many calories, your body goes into
storage mode for the “lean times,” so to speak, but the lean
time never comes. So your body simply stores those extra
calories as fat. When you eat fewer calories than your body
demands, your cells release stored fat for energy. Pretty simple
equation; however, not all fat is the same.

Placement of Fat Deposits in Your Body

The placement of fat deposits on our bodies varies depending on
each person’s genetic influences, lifestyle choices, and nutritional intake.

Men tend to store their body fat around their
bellies and chest. Women tend to store it around their hips,
buttocks, thighs, and the backs of their arms. A complete
discussion of hormones and fat storage is beyond the scope of
this article, but let it suffice to say that certain hormonal
processes do determine body fat distribution.

The Primary Factor in Failing to Lose Fat

Many people who attempt to lose body fat fail to account for
one major factor, a stumbling block to long-term success. They
approach fat loss and fitness with great enthusiasm and
determination and, with this attitude, they lose body fat and
feel great. Even so, they just can’t seem to get rid of all the fat
they want to. They lose fat successfully for a time, but ultimately
get stuck just before all of the fat is completely gone.

This is commonly known as a plateau, and this phenomenon
causes many people who were previously successful to lose their
enthusiasm and return to their old ways. When old habits take
over again – and this happens to the majority of dieters – the
body fat comes back with a vengeance. This is due to
programming of the fat cell. Each time you try to lose body fat
again, it seems to take longer and require more effort.

The Solution to Stubborn Fat

So what is the real solution? It’s simple: you must understand
how fat cells work and how to move past the plateau
phenomenon and lose the last bit of body fat-what we call
“stubborn fat.”

I have worked with many clients and I would say most of them
have a good amount of stubborn body fat. This fat is literally
programmed to be very difficult to lose. It seems to remain on
our bodies no matter what we do, hence the phrase stubborn
fat. Most modern diets and weight loss programs seem to work
in the beginning, but they never really address this crucial part
of fat loss -the last bit of stubborn fat.

Your Hormones and Stubborn Fat
Stubborn fat develops when your hormonal pathways are
broken down. Age does play a role in this: fat deposits increase
and become more resistant to fat loss methods as you get older.

This you have little control over, but some things that lead to
stubborn fat development are under your control. Yo-yo dieting
is one of them. Losing weight on crash diets and then regaining
it-often known as the “ebound effect” – only increase
stubborn fat in the long run. A decrease in exercise and activity
level also compounds the stubborn fat problem. This is why
people who crash-diet on low calories and refuse to exercise
often have the worst stubborn fat problems of all.

Our ancestors really never had to deal with this problem
because they moved and engaged in physical labor as a regular
part of daily life, whereas technological conveniences and the
modern lifestyle have caused many of us to become lazy and
inactive.

Stubborn fat is metabolized extremely slowly and resists the
hormonal process that takes place when the fat burning process
starts up. To burn fat, the adrenal hormones (better known as
adrenaline and noradrenaline) attach to the fat cell receptors
and essentially “open them up” so the fat can be used in the
energy pathways. There are two kinds of receptors in your fat
cells: one is alpha and the other beta. The beta receptors are
much more active and respond to adrenal hormones. To lose
body fat, the adrenal hormones switch on and the body begins
to use fat as energy. However, in the case of people with
stubborn fat, this does not occur, so no body fat is lost.

According to my good friend and colleague Ori Hofmekler,
author of The Warrior Diet, stubborn fat has a lower ratio of beta
receptors to alpha receptors. Therefore, your body’s hormonal
“fat dissolver,” adrenaline, is unable to enter the fat cell and
open the door. Hofmekler also points out that “to make these
matters worse, stubborn fat has more estrogen receptors, which
cause even more stubborn fat.”

If all this sounds bad enough, what makes it even worse is that if
you indulge in the typical modern diet and sedentary lifestyle,
this often results in insulin sensitivity. (For more information,
read my past article on “Insulin Sensitivity.”) On top of
everything else, your fat tissue becomes so incredibly resistant
to your attempts to lose it, it seems like you will be stuck with it
forever.

Why Dieting Alone Doesn’t Work

Diets fail because they only look at the caloric reduction side of
the equation. You need to understand the other variables in the
equation – exercise and lifestyle. You must understand the
deeper issues you are really dealing with. Getting rid of
stubborn fat is not nearly as simple as just slashing calories and
dieting. Stubborn fat is the result of a complex interplay of
biological and hormonal processes – all of which are affected by
how you eat, how you move, and the type of lifestyle you lead.

The Crucial Question

Now that you understand why you have stubborn fat, right
down to the hormone and receptor level, the question is: How
do you alter your nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle to get rid if this
EVERYONE walking the face of this earth has an abundance of
fat cells throughout their bodies. In fact, if you’re a healthy
adult with normal body composition, you have approximately
30 billion fat cells. This is an astronomical number when you
think about it. Did you ever wonder why you have so many?
Have you ever wondered what those fat cells are for?

Fat Cells Are Genetically Programmed

The answer is, fat cells are part of our genetic code and they
enable us to use stored energy when food is scarce. This survival
mechanism works very much the same today as it did 10,000
years ago. However, there is an abundance of food in modern
society today, and we no longer need to store so much fat to
survive.

When you consume too many calories, your body goes into
storage mode for the “lean times,” so to speak, but the lean
time never comes. So your body simply stores those extra
calories as fat. When you eat fewer calories than your body
demands, your cells release stored fat for energy. Pretty simple
equation; however, not all fat is the same.

Placement of Fat Deposits in Your Body

The placement of fat deposits on our bodies varies depending on
each person’s genetic influences, lifestyle choices, and nutritional intake.

Men tend to store their body fat around their
bellies and chest. Women tend to store it around their hips,
buttocks, thighs, and the backs of their arms. A complete
discussion of hormones and fat storage is beyond the scope of
this article, but let it suffice to say that certain hormonal
processes do determine body fat distribution.

The Primary Factor in Failing to Lose Fat

Many people who attempt to lose body fat fail to account for
one major factor, a stumbling block to long-term success. They
approach fat loss and fitness with great enthusiasm and
determination and, with this attitude, they lose body fat and
feel great. Even so, they just can’t seem to get rid of all the fat
they want to. They lose fat successfully for a time, but ultimately
get stuck just before all of the fat is completely gone.

This is commonly known as a plateau, and this phenomenon
causes many people who were previously successful to lose their
enthusiasm and return to their old ways. When old habits take
over again – and this happens to the majority of dieters – the
body fat comes back with a vengeance. This is due to
programming of the fat cell. Each time you try to lose body fat
again, it seems to take longer and require more effort.

The Solution to Stubborn Fat

So what is the real solution? It’s simple: you must understand
how fat cells work and how to move past the plateau
phenomenon and lose the last bit of body fat-what we call
“stubborn fat.”

I have worked with many clients and I would say most of them
have a good amount of stubborn body fat. This fat is literally
programmed to be very difficult to lose. It seems to remain on
our bodies no matter what we do, hence the phrase stubborn
fat. Most modern diets and weight loss programs seem to work
in the beginning, but they never really address this crucial part
of fat loss -the last bit of stubborn fat.

Your Hormones and Stubborn Fat
Stubborn fat develops when your hormonal pathways are
broken down. Age does play a role in this: fat deposits increase
and become more resistant to fat loss methods as you get older.

This you have little control over, but some things that lead to
stubborn fat development are under your control. Yo-yo dieting
is one of them. Losing weight on crash diets and then regaining
it-often known as the “ebound effect” – only increase
stubborn fat in the long run. A decrease in exercise and activity
level also compounds the stubborn fat problem. This is why
people who crash-diet on low calories and refuse to exercise
often have the worst stubborn fat problems of all.

Our ancestors really never had to deal with this problem
because they moved and engaged in physical labor as a regular
part of daily life, whereas technological conveniences and the
modern lifestyle have caused many of us to become lazy and
inactive.

Stubborn fat is metabolized extremely slowly and resists the
hormonal process that takes place when the fat burning process
starts up. To burn fat, the adrenal hormones (better known as
adrenaline and noradrenaline) attach to the fat cell receptors
and essentially “open them up” so the fat can be used in the
energy pathways. There are two kinds of receptors in your fat
cells: one is alpha and the other beta. The beta receptors are
much more active and respond to adrenal hormones. To lose
body fat, the adrenal hormones switch on and the body begins
to use fat as energy. However, in the case of people with
stubborn fat, this does not occur, so no body fat is lost.

According to my good friend and colleague Ori Hofmekler,
author of The Warrior Diet, stubborn fat has a lower ratio of beta
receptors to alpha receptors. Therefore, your body’s hormonal
“fat dissolver,” adrenaline, is unable to enter the fat cell and
open the door. Hofmekler also points out that “to make these
matters worse, stubborn fat has more estrogen receptors, which
cause even more stubborn fat.”

If all this sounds bad enough, what makes it even worse is that if
you indulge in the typical modern diet and sedentary lifestyle,
this often results in insulin sensitivity. (For more information,
read my past article on “Insulin Sensitivity.”) On top of
everything else, your fat tissue becomes so incredibly resistant
to your attempts to lose it, it seems like you will be stuck with it
forever.

Why Dieting Alone Doesn’t Work

Diets fail because they only look at the caloric reduction side of
the equation. You need to understand the other variables in the
equation – exercise and lifestyle. You must understand the
deeper issues you are really dealing with. Getting rid of
stubborn fat is not nearly as simple as just slashing calories and
dieting. Stubborn fat is the result of a complex interplay of
biological and hormonal processes – all of which are affected by
how you eat, how you move, and the type of lifestyle you lead.

The Crucial Question

Now that you understand why you have stubborn fat, right
down to the hormone and receptor level, the question is: How
do you alter your nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle to get rid if this
resistant body fat?

The answer is revealed in Part 2. Read on-

The answer is revealed in Part 2. Read on-

For Women Only High-Carb Diet Raises Heart Risk

Women who eat a high-carbohydrate diet — especially if they eat a lot of bread, pizza, jam, and similar products — are at an increased risk of coronary heart disease, researchers said.The same effect, however, wasn’t seen in men, according to Vittorio Krogh, MD, of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori in Milan, and colleagues.

  • Explain to interested patients that this prospective study found that women who eat a high-carbohydrate diet are at increased risk of coronary heart disease.
  • Note that the risk is removed if the carbohydrates have a low glycemic index.
  • The finding comes from a large prospective study of nearly 45,000 Italian volunteers who were followed for more than seven years on average, Krogh and colleagues said in the April 12 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

    The analysis, studying causes of cardiovascular disease, looked at Italians taking part in the long-running European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, the researchers said.

    Participants’ diets were assessed using a questionnaire, from which the researchers calculated the glycemic index, a measure of how much a carbohydrate raises blood glucose levels compared with glucose or white bread. They also calculated the glycemic load, defined as the product of the glycemic index of a food and its carbohydrate content.

    Foods with a high glycemic index included bread, sugar or honey and jam, pizza, and rice, while foods with a low glycemic index included pasta, fruit, and cakes.

    For each participant, the average glycemic index was the sum of the indices for each food they ate, multiplied by how much they ate and the percentage of carbohydrates, and divided by the total daily carbohydrate intake.

    The glycemic load calculation was similar, but without dividing by carbohydrate intake. For the analysis, participants were divided into quartiles based on carbohydrate intake.

    Over the follow-up period, the researchers found, there were 463 new cases of coronary heart disease among the 44,132 participants, including 305 among the 13,637 men and 158 among the 30,495 women.

    For both men and women, the average daily glycemic load increased by about 50% from the lowest to the highest quartile, Krogh and colleagues reported in the journal.

    In a multivariate analysis, they said, women with the highest carbohydrate intake had a significantly greater risk of heart disease than did those in the lowest quartile. The relative risk was 2.0, with a 95% confidence interval from 1.16 to 3.43.

    Those in the second and third quartiles were also at significantly elevated risk, compared with the lowest quartile, and the trend was significant at P=0.02, they found.

    Increasing carbohydrate intake from foods with a high glycemic index was also associated with increasing heart disease risk. Compared with the lowest quartile, those in the highest group had a relative risk of 1.68, with a 95% confidence interval from 1.02 to 2.75. The trend was significant at P=0.04.

    On the other hand, there was no significant increase in risk if the increased carbohydrate intake came from foods with a low glycemic index, the researchers found.

    Among men, on the other hand, there were no significant associations linking carbohydrate intake and coronary heart disease, they said.

    There is some evidence, they said, that changes in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides are stronger risk factors for cardiovascular disease for women than men. Such a difference might explain the lack of association found among men in the study, they said.

    The study’s strengths include its prospective design, the researchers said. As well, the researchers used glycemic index values set for Italian foods, rather than using international tables.

    On the other hand, they said, the questionnaires were not designed to estimate dietary glycemic index and load. In addition, they were only administered once, and some participants may have changed their diets over the study period.


    Are you a Food Addict?

    By David Grisaffi
    http://www.flattenyourabs.net

    A new study published in the journal Nature Neuroscience
    says that you may be addicted to food!

    They claim that junk food can be every bit as addictive
    as hard drugs.

    Here is the skinny – The study showed when rats were
    permitted unrestricted access to unlimited amounts of
    junk foods such as sausage, pound cake, candy and
    candy bars and bacon, they didn’t stop eating and
    the rats gained weight rapidly.

    You would expect that the satiety mechanisms would
    kick in and both physical fullness would be reached
    and hormonal messages would be sent to signal fullness.

    But the rats kept eating and eating the junk food.
    The researchers speculated that the rats had become
    addicted

    But here’s the kicker. Even when they were given an
    electric shock if they consumed more than a normal
    amount – they STILL kept eating!

    The control group of rats were fed a healthy diet,
    also with unrestricted access to the food in unlimited
    amounts, but they did not gain anywhere near as much
    weight.

    The main case made for claiming the junk food eating
    rats had become addicted revolved around the effect
    that the junk food had on dopamine receptors.

    These brain receptors are a part of the body’s reward
    system. Rats eating too much junk food suppressed this
    system and thus ate much more to satisfy themselves.

    The researchers found that if they artificially suppressed
    the receptors implicated in addiction to cocaine and
    heroin of other rats these rats will begin to eat junk
    food compulsively.

    Here are my thoughts after reading this study.

    If you think this is an isolated study or it does not
    apply to humans, think again.

    There have been many other studies on food addiction
    both in animals and humans and the findings have
    been similar.

    This trend toward junk food is easy and we tend to
    slide towards the easy way out, which is turning to
    food to feel better and eating junk food for the
    perceived convenience.

    Whether it is an easy lunch at McDonald’s or a thin
    crust pizza from the frozen food isle at dinner, the
    frequent consumption of these types of processed foods
    can become habitual or even addictive, contributing to
    obesity and all kinds of health problems.

    The simple fact is we CAN become addicted to sweets,
    high starch carbohydrates, all kinds of fats, processed
    foods and salty foods and this realization, now backed
    by research, should be a wake up call!

    It can happen easily. You give in one too many times
    and next thing you know, wham, you feel like you can’t
    stop.

    Although it’s controversial, some people – even some of
    the addiction researchers themselves – believe that food
    could be as addictive as heroin. Continue reading Are you a Food Addict?

    Postnatal women benefit from exercise: new study

    In a world first study of its kind, 161 postnatal women with no previous depressive symptoms were divided in two separate groups to test the effect of a physiotherapist-led exercise and education program on wellbeing.

    The experimental group received an eight-week “Mother and Baby” program, including specialized exercises provided by a women’s health physiotherapist combined with parenting education.

    In the second group, “Education Only” participants only received the written educational material.

    The participants of both groups were assessed for psychological wellbeing (using the Positive Affect Balance Scale), depressive symptoms (using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) and physical activity levels at baseline, after completing the program at eight weeks and then four weeks after completion.

    Study coordinator, Ms Emily Norman of the University of Melbourne’s Physiotherapy Department and women’s health physiotherapist at the Angliss Hospital, Ferntree Gully, Melbourne says, “There were significant improvements in wellbeing scores and depressive symptoms in the “Mother and Baby” group compared with the “Education Only” group over the study period.”

    “This positive effect continued four weeks after completion of the program,” she says.

    “The number of women identified as “at risk” for postnatal depression pre-intervention was reduced by 50% in the Mother and Baby group by the end of the intervention.”

    Professor Mary Galea, of the University’s Physiotherapy Department and senior author of the study says, “By improving new mothers’ wellbeing, this physiotherapy-based program has been shown to have a real impact on reducing the risk of PND.”

    “However, further study is needed to explore whether the intervention effects and improved well being are maintained beyond the first three months,” she says.

    Postnatal Depression is a major health issue affecting up to 13% of all new mothers throughout the world, with most cases commencing in the first three months of the postnatal period.

    The study was published in the March issue of Physical Therapy, the scientific journal of the American Physical Therapy Association. Source.

    You can really see the difference if you use the Firm and Flatten Your Abs Program