The Benefits of Beet Juice

The Benefits of Beet Juice

Anyone can greatly improve their progress and performance by carefully choosing what foods they eat and beat juice should be at the top of their list! Raw beets are loaded with a form of nitrates that are easily converted to nitric oxide in the human body. These healthy nitrates oxygenate the blood making the muscles respond better to resistance training! Moreover, the improved oxygen distribution to all parts of your body, including your heart and brain, will give you more stamina during workouts!

Please note that the healthy nitrates in beets are not the same as the “bad” nitrates found in processed meats like bologna, hot dogs, and deli meats. Beet juice has many other health benefits for bodybuilders too! Many studies have pointed to the fact that it lowers blood pressure. Beet juice also stabilizes blood sugar, leveling out the lows and highs after you eat. This will reduce lethargy, prevent depression, and help keep you more motivated to stay on track with your workouts. The beet root is exceptionally high in folic acid and manganese. The leaves and stems are exceptionally high in vitamin K at 500 percent the recommended daily allowance. This will help maintain your bones and prevent osteoporosis. Beet juice is also quite high in vitamin A vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, copper, choline, and silica. This is why some nutritionists call beets and beet juice a superfood.

What gives beets their color is a class of antioxidants called betalains, including both betanin and vulgaxanthin. These antioxidants are among the most powerful anti-inflammatories and fungicides known. Thus, beet juice will help your joints ache less after your workouts and will keep your feet free of fungus. Research has also shown that betalains retard cancer tumors. While the betalains are spread throughout the beet plant, they are most highly concentrated in the peel of the beet so you should never peel beets before you juice them. Continue reading The Benefits of Beet Juice

Stubborn Fat: The Beginning

EVERYONE walking the face of this earth has an abundance of
fat cells throughout their bodies. In fact, if you’re a healthy
adult with normal body composition, you have approximately
30 billion fat cells. This is an astronomical number when you
think about it. Did you ever wonder why you have so many?

Have you ever wondered what those fat cells are for?

Fat Cells Are Genetically Programmed

The answer is, fat cells are part of our genetic code and they
enable us to use stored energy when food is scarce. This survival
mechanism works very much the same today as it did 10,000
years ago. However, there is an abundance of food in modern
society today, and we no longer need to store so much fat to
survive.

When you consume too many calories, your body goes into
storage mode for the “lean times,” so to speak, but the lean
time never comes. So your body simply stores those extra
calories as fat. When you eat fewer calories than your body
demands, your cells release stored fat for energy. Pretty simple
equation; however, not all fat is the same.

Placement of Fat Deposits in Your Body

The placement of fat deposits on our bodies varies depending
on each person’s genetic influences, lifestyle choices, and
nutritional intake. Men tend to store their body fat around their
bellies and chest. Women tend to store it around their hips,
buttocks, thighs, and the backs of their arms. A complete
discussion of hormones and fat storage is beyond the scope of
this article, but let it suffice to say that certain hormonal
processes do determine body fat distribution.

How To Fight Muscle Loss=Lift Weights

When you think of a typical older person, one thing likely comes to mind: frailty. Even if you can’t really identify any obvious illness, there is something about most elderly people that communicates frailty and weakness. They probably walk slowly, move carefully and let others do many things for them, rather than doing those things themselves.

What is it?

 

It’s muscle loss, otherwise known as sarcopenia. And if you are 25 years old or older, it is happening to you already.
But you don’t have to take it sitting down (pun intended).

What is sarcopenia?

Sarcopenia refers to the process of losing skeletal muscle mass and strength. “Sarco” is the Greek word referring to flesh, and “penia” means a reduction in amount. Thus, the word describes a progressive weakening of the body caused by a “change in body compensation in favor of fat and at the expense of muscle.”

Everyone, beginning around age 25, starts to lose muscle mass, though the actual symptoms of this loss do not usually begin showing up until around the age of 40 or so. The process begins really picking up speed after the age of 65. In fact, around the age of 40, most women will lose almost a half-pound of muscle every year and replace it with fat.2

The result of this gradual loss of muscle is an insidious weakening of the body, loss of balance, loss of confidence upon walking, and a reduced ability to recover from near falls. As we lose strength, we become more inactive. This makes sense, because if we have less muscle, it takes much more effort to move, and we fatigue more easily. But also, with loss of strength comes loss of balance and stability. The fear of falling keeps many people sedentary. And a sedentary lifestyle opens the door for chronic illness. Continue reading How To Fight Muscle Loss=Lift Weights